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The Majesty Of Kevin Wada (Part 1)

Not too long ago I became smitten with the work of Phil Noto around the same time I was also introduced to artist, Kevin Wada. Wada is most recently known for his exquisitely painted covers for the Charles Soule written She-Hulk series. As I did some more research I fell in love. He strives for some forward thinking fashion designs on many well known characters, especially in the X-Universe. Redesigning their looks and resulted in new fresh takes on the characters that seemingly affected their attitudes as well. Take a look for yourself.

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Evil Geek Book Report – X-Men: Primer

Riding the high of my current X-Men Bendis buzz, I thought I’d tempt fate and see if lightning could strike twice. I wanted more X-Men but I knew I wasn’t interested in any series that had the X-Men teaching classes to new mutants so Wolverine & The X-Men was out. Brian Wood’s X-Men series (just called X-Men…like in the 90’s) was only about 11 issues in and boasts one of the best team rosters imaginable. We’re talking Storm, Psylocke, Rogue, Kitty Pryde and Rachel Grey…oh and Jubilee. What’s not to like?

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Evil Geek Book Review – X-Men Forever: Picking Up Where We Left Off

I’ve recently rekindled a love of the first series that brought me into comic books, the X-Men. Despite its faults I have nothing but love for the Claremont tenure on it; I find it both fascinating and innovative. He really had a grip on the core characters of that book and helped to build the foundation of so much of what was to come in the future. However in 1991, after 17 years on the book he wrapped up his time abruptly after a disagreement with editorial and rising star artist, Jim Lee. Uncanny X-Men became so massively popular that they introduced another book simply titled X-Men and split the teams. Claremont helped launch the new title but his last work for the franchise was with X-Men #1-3. What should have been his swan song was a decent but rushed and convoluted story involving the “death” of Magneto.

Claremont did return to various X-Men titles in the early 2000’s to less than stellar results. He complained that part of his issue was that there was so much continuity and events that happened since he had left it was almost impossible for him to write the kind of stories he wanted to. Finally in 2009 Marvel threw him a bone with X-Men Forever. The idea was that this series would continue directly after the events that happened on his last storyline from X-Men #1-3 and nothing that has happened since 1991 would have any bearing on it. He could for all intents in purposes pick up exactly where he left off.

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Be forewarned, after the jump I’m going to spoil the hell out of the first five issues of this series. It’s virtually impossible to discuss anything about it without getting into the major details. So if you want to be surprised by this book should you read it, turn away now.

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Guilty Pleasures – Excalibur

Now this isn’t the first time I’ve delved into my shameful love of unpopular comics characters, but this one is far nearer to my heart.

I grew up in what was probably the height of the X-Men’s popularity, at least in the world of comics. But this was before Marvel learned to cash in on every opportunity to make a cheap buck, so X-titles were few and far between; There was the flagship Uncanny X-Men title, which was always a good time (even when they were in Australia). Then there was  The New Mutants, my personal least favorite, which featured a team of X-Men in training.  There was X-Factor, which featured the original students of the Xavier Academy discovering and enlightening young mutants (and getting into epic battles).  And then there was Excalibur. Excalibur was a horse of a different color.

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Excalibur began as a one-shot which was, looking back, basically just a playground for some of Chris Claremont’s personal favorite characters. During the Mutant Massacre, Shadowcat and Nightcrawler had been moved to the Disabled Roster (sports reference!) due to injuries sustained in fighting the Marauders. So, as they recuperated on Muir Island, the X-Men’s base of British operations, the remaining X-Men met their demise in Dallas (or so it seemed! But that’s a guilty pleasure for another day) during the Fall of the Mutants. After their makeshift family died,  Kitty and Kurt were naturally feeling a bit disillusioned.

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Brian Braddock, better known as Captain Britain, and his girlfriend Meggan (a metamorph who could shapeshift and adapt pretty much any power) were also having some trouble.  Brian’s sister Betty, also known as Psylocke, was among the X-Men killed in the Fall of the Mutants, and Brian had subsequently been finding comfort in the shape of a bottle. And while he preferred his poison straight up, their relationship was undeniably on the rocks. Hey-ohhhh!

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Lastly, we have Rachel Summers. Rachel is the adult daughter of Scott Summers and Jean Grey from the Days of Future Past timeline. She inherited her mother’s good looks, red hair, and link to the omnipotent celestial being known as the Phoenix. She had been an X-Man as well, but after she attempted to kill one of their enemies, Wolverine stabbed her through the chest. That’s kind of like being fired from the X-Men. In her weakened and wounded state, she was taken into the custody of the other-dimensional TV executive Mojo.

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We call that one the “Canadian Exit Interview”

The storyline of Excalibur: The Sword is Drawn (the retroactively named one-shot that launched the Excalibur series) gets moving when Rachel escapes from Mojoworld and makes it back to the X-Men’s reality. She’s being hunted separately by several parties, and the rest of the heroes come to her aid and afterward resolve the fill the gap left by the X-Men’s apparent deaths.

I have to admit that I’m an enormous Captain Britain fan, probably the biggest on this side of the pond. I met him through this book as a kid, but I’ve since gone back and read most of his stories. Alan Moore and Alan Davis reinvented the character in the early 80s and the book was so much fun. In those pages, you could see two men who would arguably grow to be the finest in the respective arts cut their teeth in an unregarded corner of the Marvel Universe. It’s Alan Moore’s only substantial work for the company, and I think it’s some of his best.

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Claremont and Alan Davis took all of the high concept science fiction fun of the Captain Britain series and mixed it in with the mainstream Marvel universe. And then they came up with a recipe for even more fun… In Captain Britain, it had been established that there were many, many Earths each with it’s own Captain Britain. Beginning with issue 12 of Excalibur, Claremont and Davis took the book on a sojourn through these worlds, each with its own version of the heroes to offer. While originally advertised as a nine part storyline, the Cross-Time Caper ended up stretching out a bit to contain the insanity. crosstime

So this book became Claremont’s playground for zany alternate reality stories, and a fun time was had by all. But the real star of the book was the artist Alan Davis.  Davis, as previously mentioned, had worked on Captain Britain for quite some time earlier in the decade. He’d then went across the street to DC for a bit t work on Batman and the Outsiders and Detective Comics before returning to Marvel and doing a few insanely gorgeous issues of Uncanny X-Men. To me, Davis is the perfect superhero artist. Sure, there are people who photorealistic work, there are guys with a beautiful art deco style. But when it comes to capes and tights, Alan Davis has it down to a science.

Alan Davis left the series after intermittently drawing the first 24 issues. Shortly thereafter, Claremont followed. But then, around the time of the big X-Book relaunches, Davis came back as writer/artist and turned the book back into gold. He picked up storylines from the initial run and proved his mettle as a storyteller on par with Marvel’s golden boy Claremont. The book was goofy and it’s often regarded in hindsight as a mere footnote in Marvel history, but it was the top of line in my young eyes and that sort of thing doesn’t change.

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Evil Geek Book Report – All-New X-Men #2

Hey, remember how I said I would continue picking up All-New X-Men? Well, despite all evil appearances, I’m a man of my word.

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